Lumbar Spinal Stenosis, otherwise referred to as Lumbar Stenosis, is a degenerative condition that results from the narrowing of the spinal canal in the lower back. This occurs when tissue and/or bone grows in the openings of the spinal bones. The growth squeezes and irritates the nerves that branch out from the spinal cord, causing pain, numbness, and weakness in the legs. Learn more with Dr. Richard Nachwalter MD here:

 

The Causes

 

The most common cause of Lumbar Stenosis is changes in the spine that occur with age. Thickening of ligaments and/or discs between the bones that may be pushed backwards into the spinal canal, and the development of bony spurs that push on the nerves that branch out from the spinal cord are all examples of conditions that can lead to the narrowing of the spinal canal.

 

The Symptoms

 

The symptoms of Lumbar Stenosis typically fluctuate; some periods will be severe, while other periods will bring few to no symptoms. This condition is common among individuals older than 50, and the most prevalent symptom is leg pain that occurs when standing or walking. Patients with Lumbar Stenosis will find that they cannot walk far without leg pain. Said individuals will also find that the pain will be relieved, sometimes almost immediately, once they sit down. As time goes on, the symptoms will become more debilitating.

 

The Surgery

 

Lumbar Laminectomy, a type of spinal decompression surgery, has repeatedly proven to be the most beneficial and successful surgery in treating Lumbar Stenosis. The Laminectomy relieves pressure on the lower back, the spinal cord, and the spinal nerves, allowing patients to resume their daily activities without being restricted by pain.

 

Atlantic Spine Specialists are board-certified professionals who are known for their dedication to excellence and healing. For more information about Lumbar Spinal Stenosis, or to meet with one of their doctors, Dr. Carl Giordano or Dr. Richard Nachwalter MD, request a consultation, call our orthopedics office in Morristown, New Jersey at (973)-971-3500.